Flying with Jetstar Asia


Jetstar Asia Airways Pte Ltd (operating as Jetstar Asia) is an LCC based in Singapore. It is the Asian offshoot of Jetstar Airways, the low-cost subsidiary airline of Australia’s Qantas. It operates services to Asian countries like Thailand, Myanmar, Philippines, Japan, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Its sister airlines are Jetstar Pacific and Jetstar Japan.


I could say that it was relatively easy to navigate for a first-timer. I just had some difficulty searching for the specific dates that reflect their supposed seat sales. I initially thought it was all a joke, a come-on for suspecting buyers. You would have to come around again and again, just to realize that it’s only good for one-way tickets. But it’s still a bargain, nonetheless.


It was generally hassle-free. I was able to book two round trip  tickets bound for Singapore at around Php3,200 ($64) each. We got the confirmation page and reviewed all details. So far, so good.



I had to check my email in just a few hours, and this is what I received:


It also came with the official receipt and the breakdown of charges.


Flight (MLA>SG)

We arrived a mere hour before the counters opened. I was surprised to see the queue of people. I thought it was for China Airlines beside ours, but I was wrong. All went quite fast and smoother than expected though. We then proceeded to immigration, then our boarding gates.

We were called to depart half an hour before time. It’s small just like other LCCs, and legroom was almost non-existent. Not that I cared about it. Seats were comfortable, and I was happy to be seated near the window.  Just a four-hour flight, I thought. We waited at the threshold for an aircraft to land before taking off. It was a little bumpy at first, but eventually became steady after a while.

As I got bored looking at the clouds, I glimpsed at the food menu in front of me. Only a slab of sandwiches were available, though. I instantly smelled it when the staff delivered it to our neighbor. It wafted in the air for some time, and I resisted to urge to order one. Damn.

Three hours and forty minutes passed.

We’re almost landing in Singapore. I immediately noticed their magnificent skyline and Sentosa’s merlion from afar. I got jittery and excited, but happy  that the rest of the flight went uneventful.

Flight (SG>MLA)

Here goes the disaster.

Well, not exactly. Sorry for my exaggeration. We were already inside the plane, comfortably watching videos on our phones when an announcer suddenly said that we have to go out and return to the airport terminal. Why? Yes, you’re right. The cliche technical malfunction problem. Do we have a choice? Of course not.

Everyone were talking out loud how incompetent the airline/staff was for not finding it out sooner,  and at the same time packing their stuff and starting to leave. We, too, headed our way.

We waited for about two hours (or more) until we were called again to board. My mind was wandering? Is this another plane now? I sure hope they fixed whatever problem there was.

My question was never answered. Not that I bothered asking anyone anyway. We were all probably tired, that’s why.

My rating (1-10)
Website: 8
On-ground crew: 8
In-flight service: 7
Seat comfort: 8
Cabin interior: 8
Cleanliness: 8
Punctuality: 6
Aircraft condition: 6
Overall rating: 8
I would still recommend this airline despite the mishap we experienced. It offers cheap and reasonable prices, considering the destinations. Seats were relatively okay and in-flight staff were approachable. Their English is not that great but understandable. I wish I could recommend the sandwich but sadly, I didn’t try it. My bad. (Maybe I should, next time). But as with any other LCCs, do not expect much. You paid less for a reason. If you want more amenities, bigger legroom and a great flight experience, might as well spare more bucks for real airlines. Just my two-cents.
I hope this article would shed some light on those contemplating whether to jump on that next plane to Tokyo or Melbourne. Next on the list is Delta Airlines. Will update you on this soon enough. Carry on!

Train To Busan

Okay. Let me start this off by saying I am no professional critic. I am simply relaying my two-cents on a recent hit that left us all in awe. Yes, up until this moment, everyone around me is still talking about it.

I first saw its trailer on my feed. I wouldn’t bother looking at it, if not for the familiar actor Gong Yoo. Oh, zombies. My fave. Have I already mentioned I am a BIG fan of TWD aka The Walking Dead? I watched every season, every episode, for as many times as I can recall. But this one’s different. It’s a movie, and it’s Asian!

I checked Rotten Tomatoes and saw the 93% rating. I read the commentaries and got more curious. So I went off to watch.

My reaction afterwards?



Yeah. I was still wiping off the tears on my face while walking out. It’s also worth noting that the entire audience gave a standing ovation when the movie ended. The first time I saw this was when I watched MJ’s This Is It concert-drama roughly 7 years ago. I mean, it was really something to be applauded for. And Train to Busan, too.

Inspite my friends and colleagues strong recommendations, I did not expect much from this film. I guess I was pretty much used to the creatures I wasn’t thinking there could be more to it. TWD’s walkers ain’t that fast, they don’t change that fast, and their bodies ain’t that contorted (if you know what I mean). The zombies in this film behave in an uncanny way, almost like Sadako. It was frightening and funny at the same time. I was amazed with the way they growled and snarled their way out on others, akin to wild dogs.

Story-wise, the plot was almost like World War Z’s, a divorced father trying to make amends with his daughter. Chaos starts on the train to Busan (hence the title) where, unfortunately, it all began. One thing I really liked are the different wave of emotions you will feel the entire time; be it sad, hatred, relief, fear, worry, and everything else. It’s a ride of terror mixed with superb entertainment. Just don’t mind reading the subtitles all throughout, though.

WARNING – SPOILER ALERT!!! I was really saddened when major characters were killed off, but I know it’s all part of the story. I was thinking if they’re planning on a sequel, then the leads should still be alive. But the director’s got a different plan, I guess.

My final verdict: It definitely was a big surprise to come out in recent years, amidst all the sequels, adaptations, prequels, remakes, and what-have-you these days. I’m glad I didn’t miss the chance to see this. And you should, too.



Sentosa  Island

It’s true. This island is awesomely huge. You could probably visit and enjoy all attractions in three days (or maybe two). Well, it’s my assumption. Me and my buddy decided we’d only take the cable car and go to the most-visited place, Universal Studios!

Although we encountered some difficulty locating the ticket counter, we eventually found our way and easily exchanged our vouchers. Let me tell you that I AM acrophobic (extreme fear of heights). And as they say, face your fear. Okay, I thought of this many, many times. I told myself I wouldn’t EVER ride rollercoasters and the like, but this is different (I hope). I will just try.



The entire “trip” took only 15 minutes, but it felt like a lifetime for me. You know what I’m talking about, right? But I survived! Should I rejoice? Maybe. I halfheartedly enjoyed the spectacular view from our seats. I was screaming for a while, then I kept talking to myself. I can do this, I can do this. And I did, I guess.

After that excruciating, nerve-wracking, and gut-wrenching (at least for me) experience, we walked along the crowd. We saw Madame Tussauds along the way, but only took a pic outside.



Then, we were instructed to take the monorail going to USS. It was really cute.



Finally, we’re almost there! But first….


And who doesn’t love chocolate? Especially Hershey’s?!? I bet.



We saw the big Universal globe. Again, one of those famous backdrops. Tell you more on my next post! 😉

Day Tour in Batam, Indonesia [2]

Next stop: Sari Bumbu restaurant. We were really eager to eat because we’re all starving. I was relieved to know that it’s a buffet restaurant, not seafood. I have previously read blogs indicating that they ate in a certain Golden Prawn 933/555. It was quite a popular option included in a tour package. It was supposedly “free” and with this, I certainly didn’t expect much. Some people were saying good reviews, but most were not satisfied. I often saw terms like mediocre, so-so, and tasteless. But it’s cheap!

Fortunately, we didn’t have the chance to taste it for ourselves. What we had was the typical Indonesian cuisine. Nothing fancy, though. It was pretty good, considering. I wouldn’t say it was tasteless, but it was so-so. There were several foods to choose from, with names I couldn’t decipher. The staff were very friendly in assisting us and answering our queries. I really find it funny that they initially talk in the native tongue, then suddenly get surprised when we respond in English. It would take awhile for them to talk once again. I especially loved the fact that we can eat as much as we like, and that there was ice cream. It was scorching hot outside.


This was our first set, complete with soup and dessert. I remember coming back at least twice to get more. Haha 😀

After lunch, we headed to the next stop (and last temple for the day). It was probably the newest one we have visited. What I really liked about it was…the cute baby buddhas! There were a lot of them, each bearing some sign of good luck.


My friend said to hold the bag of money for prosperity. Hmmmm…..there’s no harm anyway.

Maha Vihara Duta Maitreya Temple

And the biggest buddha was right there in the middle. I don’t see other tourists going near it, so we didn’t bother. We were pretty much contented with the babies.

After this, we went to several shops: chocolate, Polo (which they say is authentic), kueh lapis, local delicacies, batik (traditional fabric), and Batam shopping mall.

In all of these, we managed to spend all of our pocket money for that day. Ah, were they good at convincing! I was aghast when I found that I don’t have IDR cash left, only SGD! That made me stop and instead of buying another kueh lapis box, opted to get the buy one-take one chocolate bars I spotted in the mall. Not bad, eh?

And that’s it. Our day tour was done. I was somewhat satisfied, never mind my cashless bag. It was as if we went full-blown shopping spree. We went back to Singapore with loads of plastic bags and paper boxes. Considering the difference of price between these two countries, it was a good bargain still.

If you are interested in Batam or Bintan, for that matter, you may check out Travel Delightfully and book any of their packages.

Day Tour in Batam, Indonesia [1]

Tourists to Singapore mostly go to Malaysia for a day or two of sightseeing. Well, we opted to take the unlikely route: Indonesia. There is this small island called Batam, quietly nestled an hour away. It is the largest city in the Riau islands, third-largest city in Sumatra, and eighth-largest city in Indonesia. Two nearby islands, Bintan and Bulan, are also quite popular for Singaporeans.

Batam has a tropical climate, similar to my home country. The people spoke of several languages, predominantly Indonesian. The locals were generally friendly and approachable. I would assume this is because we look like them. And because of that, it never really felt like a foreign country for me.

We landed at Sekupang International Ferry Terminal. One could immediately see the difference from where we came, the much-larger HarbourFront Centre. We rode Horizon Fast Ferry, which was relatively new compared to its competitors. We basically had no choice because this ferry was already a part of the package we availed. The entire trip was generally good and smooth-sailing. It was a cloudy day, and luckily, there was no impending typhoon.

We were greeted by a long queue of people in the immigration, and when it was our turn, everything went okay (almost).

And then, my mind was wandering. Where is our tour guide? We decided to go out of the main lobby and searched. Then a man suddenly approached us from behind, asking our names. At first, we stammered and got quiet. Then he showed us our passport copies (which we sent prior) and package itinerary. Oh! He was our tour guide! Thank God he found us. We exchanged a little greeting and proceeded to the small van waiting. I am not sure if it’s a good thing, but we were the only “guests” for that day.

First stop: Miniature Park. Locals used to call it Taman Mini Indonesia Indah. I heard that there’s another one in Jakarta, though. But this one would suffice. Various traditional houses from all over Indonesia have miniature versions in this park. It is free-of-charge.


There were so many houses! And they’re all so cute! After an hour, we went to our first temple for the day: Tua Pek Kong.

tua pek kong

There were only a few people inside. And at first, they were looking at us skeptically. Then I realized we were wearing shoes inside. Big NO-NO! I saw our guide waving at us, showing us where to put our shoes. Our bad. It was really embarrassing. Anyhow, we went again to another temple.


A big buddha was prominently placed right at the center of the entrance. It’s the first thing you’ll see. The smell of incense was pungent in every corner. We decided to burn one and whispered a short prayer. Yes, we left our shoes outside (we knew better this time) as soon as we saw the clean and clear vinyl tiles. Our guide and driver also prayed with us. Theirs was longer, though.

We also went around, as there are many small temples behind. They all look relatively the same, just with different arrangements and design. We also found a vegetarian canteen which made us remember the time. It’s almost twelve! Back to the van, it was as if our guide read our minds. He asked if we are already hungry. We both nodded.


The Airbnb Experience

I am sure that as of this writing, many people have already tried using Airbnb. It is a popular app for traveling. It offers cheaper alternative to posh hotels that is commonly chosen by frequent travelers. But times has changed. People are always looking for creative ways to earn and to mingle with different people from various backgrounds. I think it is a very effective and smart way of accomplishing these goals. And Airbnb makes it achievable.

I must admit that I was adamant at first. But since most hotels in Singapore are relatively expensive compared to that of Bangkok or Hong Kong, I might as well give it a try. I also managed to read some blogs to check out feedback from previous users. It was generally positive, although there were a few warnings. Not that I didn’t mind it, but I believe that each person would always have a different experience.After scouring the internet for news, I decided to see it myself.

And oh, the website was very inviting. It was user-friendly and had many options available. I especially was impressed with how they plan to resolve problems that may occur during the rental period. That’s inevitable, right? At least they have some contingency solutions.

Anyhow, I found a really good space. It was a private room. I didn’t want to rent the whole house for three reasons: [1] too big for the two of us, [2] more expensive, and [3] we might be sharing it with tons of other people and we personally would like to avoid that as much as possible. Although we are just renting the room, the entire house was at our disposal. We were able to use the kitchen (mostly for heating water), dining room, and living room. We had the T&B for ourselves, which was really good.


After a few exchange of  messages with the host, we finalized everything and went on with the payment. We paid a total of 102 euros. Yes, it is euros.


We arrived and left the apartment safe and sound. Everything went well. The hosts were nice people and really gave us the best possible experience. We never felt like guests. We were even offered dinner, at one time. Remember to keep the place clean before you leave. It is very important. You would want to make a good impression, because they will also leave a feedback on your account afterwards. That would make it easier for other hosts to accept your reservation next time.

So if you are looking for an accommodation on your next vacation, why not check Airbnb and see how it’s like. I sure hope you will have a wonderful time. Just choose wisely, okay?


Nasi Lemak of Malaysia

It was already past lunch time when we realized we are starving. We only had cereals and a cupcake that morning, I remembered. And since the price of restaurants inside Universal Studios are ridiculously high, we decided to look for affordable options outside. Then we found Malaysian Food Street. Although we are not sure if it is indeed authentic, we tried it nonetheless.


Once inside, we saw a lot of people eating. It was pretty much like your normal food court, albeit bigger. There was a long line of food stalls, with cheap eats ranging from $7 and up. There is a variety of cuisines to choose from:  Thai, Indian, Chinese, Singaporean, and of course, Malaysian.We had some real difficulty choosing which one to eat. But alas, we found one with less queueing and a very tempting aroma.

Nasi Lemak is a popular dish in Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and South of Thailand. It is also considered the national dish of Malaysia. It is usually composed of: rice (cooked in coconut milk and pandan leaves), sambal, anchovies, boiled egg, roasted peanuts and some slices of cucumber. It is best eaten on a banana leaf for a more traditional sense.


The verdict? I loved the garlic chicken and roasted peanuts the most. The sweet aroma of the coconut rice was appetizing. The hint of spice brought about by sambal evened out the crispiness of the chicken and anchovies.The cucumbers and peanuts are a perfect way to finish off your meal.

What are you waiting for? Look out for the nearest Malaysian restaurant you can find and see for yourself. Or might as well make one of your own. I am sure it will be equally delicious!